Start-up,
Technology,
Innovation.

Events to foster the entrepreneurial spirit.

Signed-Agreement.jpg?fit=960%2C638

September 19, 2017 brian prokopowich0

 

 

Introduction

The case of Hibberd v. Hurricane Hydrocarbons Ltd. involved various issues regarding many stock options that were not exercised that were part of a consultant contract.

 

Facts

If you read through the 150 paragraphs of this case, you might find that the minutiae of details within the judgement are like the digressions on Targaryen history in Game of Thrones, interesting but not exactly necessary information. So I will summarize:

 

The defendants, Hurricane Hydrocarbons Ltd., had engaged the services of the plaintiff, Mr. Hibberd, and his company, for the purpose of raising capital for the defendant to purchase a company in Kazakhstan.  As part of the agreement for the plaintiff’s services, in lieu of money they were verbally offered 100,000 stock options.

A written agreement came into effect for 50,000 with a termination clause that the option may be exercised any time until 60 days after his services are terminated, or before the options expire.

According to the plaintiff – the contractor – who signed off on these options, he was given representations that it was a standard clause and it wouldn’t be exercised.

The plaintiff entered into another agreement for 50,000 stock options that included a termination clause. It was the plaintiff’s understanding that the contract would not be terminated until after the options expired – and this was confirmed verbally, according to the contractor.  Later, the defendant terminated the contract in question. The plaintiff did not exercise his options within the 60 days period of the termination, but he attempted to exercise the option months later.

To finish reading the Clausehound blog: Click Here

This blog was originally posted by Farrah Roahman

Co-authors: Brendan Sheehan and Rajah Lehal

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.


pexels-photo-coins.jpg?fit=1200%2C800

August 31, 2017 brian prokopowich0

Directors – names are (in most jurisdictions) recorded on the public registrar, role is to protect the shareholders, accept some legal liability, vote on company major decisions. No hands on day-to-day activities.

Executive Director – same as above, but also in an executive role (e.g. President), with hands on day-to-day operational activities.

Advisors – No voting rights, usually are experienced or well-connected business people, guide the founders.

 

Compensation may vary for directors/advisors 

I had previously written in this article that whether a company has a board of directors or a board of advisors, compensation is flexible.

A company may choose to compensate either a director or an advisor in cash, with options, a combination of cash and options, cash only, or the company may even choose not to compensate such directors. This is not a critical factor for choosing a board of advisors over a board of directors or vice versa. 

Public company board of director positions can receive seven digit compensation.  At the other end of the spectrum, a startup company more likely can offer options for compensation.  When offering option-based compensation consider the following:

To finish reading the Clausehound blog: Click Here

This blog was originally posted by Farrah Roahman

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.


arguing-1296392_1280.png?fit=1200%2C848

July 25, 2017 brian prokopowich0

When you’re involved in a contractual dispute, the process for resolving the dispute should be set out in the contract itself.

If the contract is silent on the point and you can’t resolve your dispute, you will have to use the courts. This can lead to disagreement about which courts have jurisdiction, so it is important to include clauses dealing with both governing law (what law applies) and jurisdiction (which courts can decide a case) in your contract.

To finish reading the Clausehound blog: Click Here

This blog was originally posted by Farrah Roahman

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.


writing-1149962_1920.jpg?fit=1200%2C801

June 3, 2017 brian prokopowich0

Except for few specific circumstances, it is almost considered ancient to have parties to a contract physically meet up to a sign a contract in a boardroom. With the fast-paced lifestyles of most high-level executives, a more efficient method of signing contracts has been introduced: the e-Signature.

 

Although convenient, do e-signatures really create a valid and binding contract? Can e-signatures really replace hand-written signatures?

To finish reading the Clausehound blog: Click Here

This blog was originally posted by Farrah Roahman

This article is provided for informational purposes only and does not create a lawyer-client relationship with the reader. It is not legal advice and should not be regarded as such. Any reliance on the information is solely at the reader’s own risk. Clausehound.com is a legal tool geared towards entrepreneurs, early-stage businesses and small businesses alike to help draft legal documents to make businesses more productive. Clausehound offers a $10 per month DIY Legal Library which hosts tens of thousands of legal clauses, contracts, articles, lawyer commentaries and instructional videos. Find Clausehound.com where you see this logo.